Lupus

Lupus And Social Security Disability Benefits

What Is Lupus?
Can I Get Social Security Disability Benefits If I Suffer From Lupus?
Is There A Specific Listing For Lupus?
If I Do Not Meet The Listing, Is There Another Way I Can Get Social Security Disability Benefits?
 

 

What Is Lupus?

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), commonly referred to as lupus, is a chronic autoimmune connective tissue disease that can perturb any part of the body. Because your immune system plays a vital role in protecting your body from getting sick, a disease such as lupus that affects the immune system can be quite serious.
The pain from lupus is typically irregular, alternating between periods of illness and remission and can be unpredictable. Not only is the illness unpredictable, but so are the symptoms. Unlike many diseases that come with specific warnings of contraction, signs of lupus can be as simple as unusual fatigue, pain in the joints, or a fever. For this reason, lupus often takes a long time to diagnose. It can be especially frustrating because there may be periods where an individual feels he or she is able to complete routine tasks with ease and then, out of no where, it feels like the weight of the world comes crashing down. It should be noted that while some signs of lupus can be fairly ordinary, others can have an immediate disabling impact on the individual. It is also the case that the majority of diagnosed lupus cases are predominantly in women. There is no cure for lupus.

 

 

Can I Get Social Security Disability Benefits If I Suffer From Lupus?

Lupus is absolutely recognized by the Social Security Administration! If you suffer from lupus and it is preventing you from earning more than $1000 a month in gross wages for at least 12 months, you may qualify for Social Security disability benefits (whether SSDI or SSI). When you apply for disability benefits with lupus, the Social Security Administration will first determine whether your condition is severe enough to meet a listing. If you meet a listing, fantastic, you will be found disabled! If you do not meet a listing, the Social Security Administration will then evaluate your residual functional capacity (the most work that you can do despite your medical condition(s)).

 

 

Is There A Specific Listing For Lupus?

The Social Security Administration recognizes lupus under Listing of Impairments 14.02: Systemic lupus erythematosus. Below is the listing:

14.02 Systemic lupus erythematosus:
A. Involvement of two or more organs/body systems, with:
1. One of the organs/body systems involved to at least a moderate level of severity; and
2. At least two of the constitutional symptoms or signs (severe fatigue, fever, malaise, or involuntary weight loss).
OR
B. Repeated manifestations of SLE, with at least two of the constitutional symptoms or signs (severe fatigue, fever, malaise, or involuntary weight loss) and one of the following at the marked level:
1. Limitation of activities of daily living.
2. Limitation in maintaining social functioning.
3. Limitation in completing tasks in a timely manner due to deficiencies in concentration, persistence, or pace.

Listing 14.02 can be found on the Social Security Administration website. However, because most of the listing is structured using medical terminology, it can be quite difficult to know whether you will meet the lupus listing. If you or a family member suffers from lupus and are unable to work and want to know more about whether you might qualify for Social Security disability benefits, contact Social Security Defenders or fill out our free online consultation form.

 

 

If I Do Not Meet The Listing, Is There Another Way I Can Get Social Security Disability Benefits?

Yes! If you do not meet Listing 14.09 and inflammatory arthritis is preventing you from working, you may still qualify for Social Security disability benefits.

Yes! If you do not meet Listing 14.02 and lupus is preventing you from working, you may still qualify for Social Security disability benefits. The Social Security Administration will proceed with your case by evaluating your Residual Functional Capacity. To do this, the Administration will determine the most amount of work that you can do despite your limitations. They do this by dividing “work” into four different categories: heavy, medium, light, and sedentary. It is worth noting that there is sometimes a fifth category that is recognized for very heavy work; however, very heavy work is scarcely used. Whether a claimant wins his or her disability claim is greatly affected by which category he or she is ultimately put into. Being put into a lower category increases the likelihood that a claim is approved for Social Security disability benefits. For more information on residual functional capacity, feel free to visit an article we published on GoingLegal.

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